Light it Up Blue for World Autism Awareness Day 2018: What you need to know

April 02, 2018

Light it Up Blue for World Autism Awareness Day 2018: What you need to know

Light it Up Blue for World Autism Awareness Day 2018: What you need to know

Today, the world will turn blue in honor of World Autism Awareness Day.

It's all part of Light it Up Blue, a campaign spearheaded by the autism community that aims to foster understanding and acceptance for those with autism. Supporters are encouraged to wear blue clothing and post to social media using the hashtag #LightItUpBlue to raise awareness.

In addition, landmarks around the world will turn blue in support of the cause. Niagara Falls, the United Nations, the Empire State Building, the White House and state government buildings are just a few of the landmarks to glow blue on April 2 in years past.

On World Autism Awareness Day and throughout April, which is Autism Awareness Month, local organizations hold a variety of events and educational activities to help the public learn more about autism spectrum disorder, which impacts 1% of the world population.

What is Autism

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder, refers to a range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication, as well as by unique strengths and differences. We now know that there is not one autism but many types, caused by different combinations of genetic and environmental influences.

The term “spectrum” reflects the wide variation in challenges and strengths possessed by each person with autism.

Autism’s most-obvious signs tend to appear between 2 and 3 years of age. In some cases, it can be diagnosed as early as 18 months. Some developmental delays associated with autism can be identified and addressed even earlier. Autism Speaks urges parents with concerns to seek evaluation without delay, as early intervention can improve outcomes.

Some facts about autism 

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates autism’s prevalence as 1 in 68 children in the United States. This includes 1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls.
  • An estimated 50,000 teens with autism become adults – and lose school-based autism services – each year.
  • Around one third of people with autism remain nonverbal.
  • Around one third of people with autism have an intellectual disability.
  • Certain medical and mental health issues frequently accompany autism. They include gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, seizures, sleep disturbances, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety and phobias.

HOVR helps alleviate the negative effects of ADD / ADHD and other focus/concentration difficulties

HOVR is a godsend for tasks requiring focus and concentration which can be challenging for those living with autism. Over 130 schools within the US and Canada have found great results from HOVR. 

 

 

 





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